[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Look's Like Mel's lawyers where correct



from FMBQ:   http://www.fmqb.com

Broadcasters Must Pay To Play On The íNet

 After months of legal wrangling, the U.S. Copyright Office has ruled
that radio stations
 currently simulcasting their programming through streaming audio on the
Internet
 must pay additional licensing fees to the record companies. While an
exact amount
 has yet to be determined by an arbitration panel, the cost could add up
considerably
 as the fees will be retroactive to 1998. Although radio stations
currently pay fees to
 ASCAP and BMI for both their terrestrial and Internet broadcasts, this
marks the first
 time that they will also be required to pay directly to the record
industry for use of
 their product. Broadcasters have opposed the additional fees,
contending that radio
 airplay and subsequent Webcasts essentially provide advertising for the
record
 industry, helping to sell more product. President/CEO Edward Fritts has
stated that
 the organization will contest the ruling in a New York district court.
Following the
 ruling, Fritts reiterated that "broadcasters currently pay hundreds of
millions of dollars
 annually to the licensing societies representing the authors, composers
and
 publishers, and have never been required to pay additional fees to the
record
 companies and artists."